Simplify By Narrowing All Your Freight Trucking Companies to a Single Resource

August 7th, 2012

When you are shipping across a wide range of regions, it can quickly get complicated. I owned a company out west that shipped to a network of stores in the mid-west. I’d often end up working with as string of freight trucking companies just to get my goods shipped across the country.

It was hard to keep track of who had what, plus everyone wanted their cut. I’d end up paying considerably to a large number of companies that my shipping costs where through the roof.

That’s when I decided to simplify by working with a wide network of freight trucking companies that had branches across the country. My goods could be shipped by one company for a more efficient bill. Because I wasn’t working with a string of companies that each wanted a cut, I had more profit left over when it was all said and done. Working with a single network for all my shipping needs simplified the costs and saved me money.

The United States is a country of vast regions. When you are shipping thousands of miles, it only makes sense to work with a single company that can deliver the goods with one single itemized report. Don’t lose your profit in the details. Get the whole process streamlined for a single bill that’s easy to itemize and compare. It will be cheaper, simpler and save you a lot of headaches.

When you work with a single company, there’s one entity who carries the responsibility, so there’s more accountability. You can get direct answers to your questions from one resource. If product gets tied up, it takes one phone call to discover where it is.

When I made the switch, I immediately felt the difference. I had one company to hold accountable, one company to keep track of, one bill to itemize and compare.

Why break your shipping costs up over a number of companies in a confusing mess that can be hard to keep track of, especially when you face an immediate problem? Working with a network of freight trucking companies simplifies your costs, your itemization and your accountability concerns. Find one company to handle all your needs. The efficiency will save you time as money, not to mention a brain freeze.

The Green Supply Chain – Rail Freight and Rail Transportation Companies Are Back!

August 3rd, 2012

Do you like the CSX commercial where they claim 900 tons of freight can move one mile with gallon of diesel? Well it’s true! Rail transportation, rail freight, and rail trucking is back and better than ever. It does cost less relative to trucking in some cases. Most of the product carried by rail transportation companies need to be going longer distances, weigh more, and transit time is predicable, consistent and not as important to the producer or the consumer. The additional benefit is reduced congestion on the highways caused by top 100 trucking companies and general trucking. Less congestion by freight trucking companies also means less pollutants getting into the air and causing environmental damage. With the price of oil going through the roof rail has become the new “green” transportation mode for many shippers. At Transport Systems Inc we specialize in handing rail freight, rail trucking, and rail logistics services for our clients. We offer rail transload services in major Northeast, Mid Atlantic and Chicago regions. We have nj warehouse, pa warehouse, chicago warehouse operations in place to handle transloading rail box cars onto trucks and ocean containers to better service your rail freight and trucking freight. Most rail transportation companies only offer a limited service whereas Transport Systems Inc offers an integrated service to provide the warehousing, trucking and container freight management services for our customers. Strategic warehouses located in nj, pa and il is positioned to have freight and inventory closer to your customers in the most economical mode of transport for heavy products such as lumber, steel, paper and other materials best suited for rail transport. The three keys for rail freight are – heavy product, longer distances and flexible but consistent transit time. Looking for a way to convert trucking into rail freight. Look no further than Transport Systems Inc located in Basking Ridge, NJ. They provide nj warehouse, chicago warehouse and are one of the top 100 shipping trucking companies in the Northeast.

Economic Geography

July 23rd, 2012

Knowing what is shipped, how its shipped, where its shipped and how much is shipped is vital intelligence to any business. Obviously any company either located in the US or abroad knows where their current customers are located. It is as simple as looking at your invoices at any point in time. A company will also know some of their prospect locations. They may also know where their competition is. All of these factors entails knowing something about geography and how it relates to doing business in today’s economy.

A supply chain is described as the point of manufacture (where) to the point of consumption. (where) It can also be expanded upstream to acquiring the raw materials for manufacturing. However for this exercise we will start at the point of manufacture. Once these points are established for each customer or prospect we then need to determine the commodity and quantity (what) shipped and the mode of transportation (how) throughout the supply chain for each customer or prospect. The same can be done from your competitors manufacturing (where) to the point of consumption (where) by using the same model.

So if a company is trying to determine if their supply chain is optimized to reduce cost while maintaining service levels an understanding of economic geography is very much in play. How to approach developing the model with the various components is the key in understanding a final recommendation and implementation of a solution. There will be trade offs between the (where) withing its own category. For example, manufacturing to produce paper near the end user can and must likely be impossible. For instance, pulp (used to make paper) newsprint, paper and paperboard accounted for 22 million tons in the Northeast in 2007 according to the US Census. However, there are very little paper mills located in major Northeast metropolitan cities because of the obvious reason – to produce paper needs wood. So paper mills tend to be located in less populated areas with an abundance of wood to make paper. Thus, Maine is one of the largest producers of paper in the Northeast. Therefore the manufacturing component is less flexible in its location. The Northeast is a large consumer of paper products and primary in major metropolitan areas. Therefore, a paper supply chain will account for a relatively longer distance between manufacture and consumption.

The last component is how paper is shipped a longer distance because of the product and where it is produced and consumed. The longer the distance impacts the actual mode of transport to make it cost efficient and still meet service requirements of the customer. Also the weight of the product will also have an impact on how it is shipped in conjunction with the mode of transport. In the case of the paper industry most manufacturers will locate a warehouse in nj or find a nj warehouse with rail (mode) to accommodate heavy shipments over a relatively long distance. (500 miles or more)

NJ Warehouse or PA Warehouse for Parts Fulfillment

July 17th, 2012

Service parts in an nj warehouse or pa warehouse are simply parts used for the repair or maintenance of an assembled product. Service parts logistics involves:

– how/where parts are stored
– how parts are shipped to customer sites/field engineers
– getting damaged parts back from the field
– repairing parts for return to inventory
– tracking parts through every stage of the service and repair cycle
– maintaining detailed information on all of the above and analyzing the information to make smart decisions that improve service levels and reduce costs.

The number of companies outsourcing their service part management to a nj warehouse is on the rise, creating opportunities for providers like Transport Systems Inc that can add value in this area and help high-tech manufacturers and service organizations compete. Why the increasing emphasis on service parts logistics?

• More competition. The more competition, the more price competitive companies need to be, therefore the need to streamline operational costs. Also, there’s a need to “keep up with the Joneses.” For competitive reasons, there is serious pressure to excel at service parts management.
• Increasing emphasis on service to drive profits. In today’s high-tech marketplace, the money machine is no longer hardware technology, it’s service. Hardware margins have decreased and service revenues are now driving a higher portion of the profits at technology manufacturers and resellers. (The typical margin on a PC might be 8-10%, while a service contract can generate a 30% return.) This has increased the attention on managing the service process. The more costs you can take out of the system on the operations side, the more money that falls to the bottom line. As the importance of streamlining service-related costs rises, high-tech companies are realizing that they lack the expertise to effectively manage this process.
• No time for downtime. An increasing reliance on computer-based technology to run essential business applications has meant that down equipment can have a major financial impact on an organization. Infonetics Research estimates that downtime due to local area network problems alone is costing corporations an average of $7.5 million yearly. Companies need to bring critical equipment back up fast, creating opportunities for service and support organizations that can help make this happen.
• Desire to focus on core business. High-tech companies have grown up fast and are now having to deal with issues like logistics. Many are recognizing that this is not a core business for them and are outsourcing so they can stay focused on research and sales and marketing.
• Need for efficient handling of reverse logistics on service parts. According to industry consultant Joe Patton, author of many books and articles on service parts logistics, we need to treat defective inventory with the same respect and effort given to good on-hand inventory. “Once you’ve spent money on service parts, you get only a fraction of that part’s cost back,” says Patton. “We need to treat that as a recoverable asset that can be repaired for 30% of its new value, and we need to pay more attention to getting those repairable parts recycled more quickly through the return and repair pipeline.”

Paper Warehouse in Chicago with Rail Service

July 12th, 2012

Knowing what is shipped, how its shipped, where its shipped and how much is shipped is vital intelligence to any business. Obviously any company either located in the US or abroad knows where their current customers are located. It is as simple as looking at your invoices at any point in time. A company will also know some of their prospect locations. They may also know where their competition is. All of these factors entails knowing something about geography and how it relates to doing business in today’s economy.

A supply chain is described as the point of manufacture (where) to the point of consumption. (where) It can also be expanded upstream to acquiring the raw materials for manufacturing. However for this exercise we will start at the point of manufacture. Once these points are established for each customer or prospect we then need to determine the commodity and quantity (what) shipped and the mode of transportation (how) throughout the supply chain for each customer or prospect. The same can be done from your competitors manufacturing (where) to the point of consumption (where) by using the same model.

So if a company is trying to determine if their supply chain is optimized to reduce cost while maintaining service levels an understanding of economic geography is very much in play. How to approach developing the model with the various components is the key in understanding a final recommendation and implementation of a solution. There will be trade offs between the (where) withing its own category. For example, manufacturing to produce paper near the end user can and must likely be impossible. For instance, pulp (used to make paper) newsprint, paper and paperboard accounted for 33 million tons in the Midwest in 2007 according to the US Census. However, there are very little paper mills located in major Midwest metropolitan cities because of the obvious reason – to produce paper needs wood. So paper mills tend to be located in less populated areas with an abundance of wood to make paper. Thus, Maine is one of the largest producers of paper in the US. Therefore the manufacturing component is less flexible in its location. The Midwest is a large consumer of paper products and primary in major metropolitan areas. Therefore, a paper supply chain will account for a relatively longer distance between manufacture and consumption.

The last component is how paper is shipped a longer distance because of the product and where it is produced and consumed. The longer the distance impacts the actual mode of transport to make it cost efficient and still meet service requirements of the customer. Also the weight of the product will also have an impact on how it is shipped in conjunction with the mode of transport. In the case of the paper industry most manufacturers will locate a warehouse in chicago or find a chicago warehouse with rail (mode) to accommodate heavy shipments over a relatively long distance. (750 miles or more)

PA Warehouse Contract Issues

July 7th, 2012

The following is a list of some of the legal issues which may come up in discussions with a client or potential client using a public pa warehouse, prior to the time that the actual contract is negotiated. Along with each of these issues is a brief statement of our position on the issue. In some cases, we included some of the rationale for our position. The purpose of this is to give you sufficient information so that if the issues arises, you will be able to advise the customer as to how we approach that issue with our customers. Our contract concepts are the industry standard for outsourced logistics.

Liability For Lost Or Damaged Product in a pa warehouse. Common requests of Customers are: to increase our standard of care; to have us responsible for the retail price of their products if lost or damaged; to use their inventory management system; or to insure their products.

Standard of Care. Our standard of care (to use such care as a reasonably careful person would use in similar circumstances) is set by the laws of each state (the Uniform Commercial Code) and must not be changed, even in what may seem to be a minor way. We risk voiding our insurance coverage.

Value of Product. If we increase our financial responsibility for a Customer’s Product we risk losing our insurance protections. Our maximum limit of liability depends on a variety of factors, however, in no event can we agree to pay retail or wholesale costs. If it is not already in the agreement, an increase in valuation (in excess of the public contract form) will also make it necessary to include a Shrinkage Allowance so that we are not exposed to the first-dollar value of lost or damaged Products. Consult with Legal if the customer wishes to increase this valuation or adjust the Shrinkage Allowance.

Inventory Systems. Warehouseman must have exclusive care, custody and control of the Customer’s Product. In addition to physical possession of the goods, Warehouseman must have exclusive control of the inventory management system which tracks inventory. Except for a few rare exceptions, if we use the customer’s system, we should not be responsible for inventory shortage (although we would still be liable for product damage caused by our negligence). Recent experiences reinforce the need for this point.

Insurance. Our Customers are responsible for insuring their Products against fire and other casualty. Customers usually are under the mistaken impression that we insure their goods.

Performance Metrics / Promises re: Perfect Performance. We must fully understand the Customer’s operations and the Products before agreeing to high performance metrics. We cannot agree to “100%” metrics or other unreasonable measures of performance at the beginning of most relationships. Metrics are guaranteed minimum standards of performance, not merely goals for us to work toward.

Legal Involvement. Generally, the larger the customer, the longer a contract will take to complete. (This is true even in situations where our business with that customer may not be very large.) Please arrange for us to speak directly to the customer’s legal department as soon as possible after the awarding of the business. Feel free to consult with us whenever the issues in this memo come up and provide us with information on the products, scope of operations, facilities, pricing, etc. as soon as possible in the process so that we can more quickly negotiate an accurate contract.

Penalties for Errors / Substandard Performance. Our contracts address these concepts by allowing the Customer to terminate the contract easily (“without cause”) if they are not satisfied with our performance. This provides the strongest of business incentives for a warehouseman to do an exceptional job. We will not reimburse or pay Customers for lost profits, downtime, penalties imposed by their customers, punitive damages or other consequential losses. We also do not agree to fixed or arbitrary penalties for failing to satisfy a service metric or deadline. Shift the focus to incentives for exceeding their expectations.

Termination Provisions and Payments. A Customer’s right to terminate the Contract “for cause” and any payments which either party would have to make to the other on termination must be reviewed by Legal.

Direct Selling and Product Fulfillment

July 3rd, 2012

I understand how difficult it is to make an impression on anyone with a simple email or letter these days, and as CEO of Transport Systems Inc, I know I am personally bombarded with unneeded communication. But, every now and then I receive something that hits my desk just when I have a need. I hope this is one of those times! Please read on a few more lines, and find you have the appropriate situation, I feel it would be in both of our interests to schedule a short telephone call to discuss our companies.

If you have products that are fulfilled directly to your customers via your own operations or a poor performing third party fulfillment company and are looking for ways to improve service levels and reduce cost (including parcel delivery cost), we might be a great fit. We are a third party logistics company with multiple distribution center locations in:

Atlanta, GA, Avenel, NJ – NJ Warehouse, Chicago, IL – Chicago Warehouse, Phoenix, AZ, Easton, PA – PA Warehouse, North Haven, CT

Our current customer list includes some of the top Direct Selling Association (DSA) members as well as other Ecommerce and International companies. We are a supplier member of the DSA, and understand the direct selling business and the specific fulfillment and logistical needs of our B to C and DSA partners. Our clients include:

• MonaVie
• FreeLife
• Vemma
• Traci Lynn Jewelry
• Edible Arrangements
• Bucky Balls
• Busted Tees
• Bayer Pharmaceuticals
• It Works

I have enclosed material for your review which will provide insight into Transport Systems Inc, our capabilities and value proposition.

I believe Transport Systems Inc’s major value proposition to you is our deep understanding of B to C fulfillment in the direct selling space, with systems tuned for efficiency and client support, along with our multiple distribution center model. These sites provide two advantages: 1) elimination and reduction of common carrier shipping zones 6, 7 & 8, resulting in significant shipping cost savings; and 2) faster delivery times (2/3 days maximum for the 48 states) which fosters field satisfaction and brand loyalty.

If realizing these major advantages is of interest to you, please give me a call for further discussion. Also, I would be pleased to schedule a meeting at your office and at your convenience to follow up in detail.
If you’ve read this far, then thank you for your time and potential consideration of Transport Systems Inc!

A Warehouse Chicago for Your Surplus Goods

June 30th, 2012

You should definitely find a good warehouse Chicago if you know that there is no feasible way for you to store your surplus inventory in your home or business, but yet are not quite ready to liquidate it because you’re waiting on getting a good deal, or using it in some other business venture. There is no reason for you to feel compelled to get rid of your belongings just because you do not know where to put them; rather, you should start researching the various warehouses in the area until you find one you feel fits your needs.

There are some variables to consider when you’re choosing your warehouse Chicago, so perhaps you could investigate a couple of them before you make a final decision. One of the simple things to consider is that you’ll probably want to find one within close proximity to where you work if you’re going to need to access the inventory from time to time. You might need to grab some items to serve as prototypes to potential customers, for instance.

Another thing to consider is that you’ll want to find one with rates well within your budget, especially if you only intend on using the warehouse for a couple of months. If this is the case, you shouldn’t find that your surplus items are costing you so much you’d have been better off just liquidating them in the first place. The right warehouse should ideally fit into your budget with ease.

Also, make sure that you’re dealing with a warehouse with a staff that has ample experience in all kinds of logistics. You’ll want to make sure that you’re not going to have any trouble if you have to arrange for a trucking company to drop off some goods, or need to ship yours out from the warehouse to a secondary location. The right warehouse staff should be able to perform these duties on your behalf.

If you’re having some second thoughts about the warehouse you think you’d like to use, then you should definitely spend some time online accessing additional information about the company and its background. Read through some customer testimonials or see if they actually specialize in the import and export of some items such as paper goods if you’re in a very specialized industry yourself.

The Right NJ Warehouse for Your Storage Needs

June 25th, 2012

You should definitely look into some NJ warehouse options if you feel like you would benefit from having a safe place to put your goods when you do not have room for them at your place of business. You should definitely look into these things if you’re someone who actually limited yourself from making large purchases because you didn’t know what you’d do with all of your things. If this is the case, then you definitely should go to some resources to learn more about all of the storage facilities in town.

The reason you’ll want to look into a couple different NJ warehouse choices is that some cater to specific industries or products that others do not. For instance, some of the best warehouses specifically cater to people trying to store and ship paper goods, while others might specialize in larger items that would be difficult to store in most facilities that are not as large.

You should also think carefully about finding a good warehouse if you know you’re only going to need it for a couple of months rather than an entire year. Why waste your money on a warehouse for months on end when it’s essentially going to sit empty during that time? This is something you’ll obviously want to avoid at all costs, so make sure that you make sure you can sign a short-term contract.

Another one of your needs might involve someone doing some cursory inventory management for you, or helping you receive shipments that go directly to the warehouse as opposed to your retail storefront. There’s no reason to go to the trouble of transporting these things to the warehouse if they just as easily could go to this location in the first place.

Beyond that, you’ll definitely want to make an effort to find a storage facility with rates that are well within your price range, just so that you do not run into any difficulty with maintaining the space. It would not be wise to choose one that’s beyond your range because if something comes up that truly requires you to have the space, you will need to be certain that it’s accessible to you at all times.

Finding a Warehouse Chicago with Good Security

December 11th, 2011

You should always look at the security profile of any warehouse Chicago if it’s imperative for you to feel confident that your inventory is going to be kept safe. Imagine if you spent a substantial sum of money on this inventory and know it’s going to play an integral role in your business at some later point in time. You would be absolutely devastated if something happened to your surplus of goods simply due to a lack of competency of the warehouse staff or because not enough security measures were put into place to keep outsiders away from the storage facility.

Therefore, you might want to see if the warehouse Chicago you have in mind has any extra safety precautions that could make you feel somewhat more confident. For instance, some of the best warehouses have extra security cameras at all points of entry so that people will definitely be caught on tape if they’re walking around the warehouse.

Or, maybe you’d simply feel a bit more confident if the warehouse itself is in a good part of town. Also, think about the proximity of the warehouse to all major highways in the area. If it’s right off one of the main exits in town, this is advantageous because it will be quite easy for freight trucks to drop off your goods at the company and the driver will not have to go out of his way. This is something important to consider if you know you’d ideally like to receive shipments at the warehouse rather than your place of business.

You also should think carefully about whether or not you feel confident in the abilities of the staff to manage your inventory and perform basic inventory control. If you have good loss prevention techniques already in place, then it’s much les likely to be an issue that any of your belongings go missing in transit. You should make sure that the company has a history of excellence in this regard.

Don’t forget to make sure that some security guards are on staff as well, and try to get a sense of whether or not the people working at the warehouse all have a strong dedication to excellence. If you get the feeling that this is the case, then at least you’ll be somewhat more confident in your ability to get excellent service from the company overall, and you’ll be able to know that your goods are kept safe.